CONTRIBUTORS

CONTRIBUTORS


2017

Volume 4 (active)
(ISSN 2328-9457 online)


Cameron Morse (“Astrocytoma” & “Good Morning”) taught and studied in China. Diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2014, he is currently a third-year MFA candidate at UMKC and lives with his wife, Lili, in Blue Springs, Missouri. His poems have been or will be published in over 50 different magazines, including New Letters, pamplemousse, Fourth & Sycamore and TYPO. His first collection, Fall Risk, is forthcoming from Glass Lyre Press.

 


Contributing
Artists & Photographers

Anne Lau

Anne Lau works as a creative in advertising at DDB Sydney. By day, she thinks of ideas to sell things like cars, home loans, and fast food. By night (or weekends, or whenever she finds a spare moment), she draws cartoons. See more of Anne Lau’s work @annelaudraws on Instagram.

 

 

 

Flowers & Drawings v.2 by Alexander Miroshnikov
Alexander Miroshnikov

Alexander Miroshnikov is an artist based in Moscow, Russia. His artwork Flowers & Drawings v.2 accompanies Cameron Morse’s poem “Good Morning.”

 

 

 

 

Untitled 16″ x 20″ oil painting by O. Norton, June 21, 2016.
O. Norton

O. Norton (Untitled 16″ x 20″ oil painting, June 21, 2016). His artwork accompanies the poem “Astrocytoma” by Cameron Morse. O. Norton is based in Worcester, England. He can be reached at o.n_artwork@yahoo.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 


SPRING/SUMMER 2015

Volume 3, Number 1
(ISSN 2328-9449 print; ISSN 2328-9457 online)


Matthew James Babcock‘s (“Boogaloo Too,” p. 26) essays have appeared or will appear in The Fiddleback; War, Literature, and the Arts; Aethlon; and Atticus Review. “The Handicap bug” was listed as “notable” in the Best American Essays 2012. His fiction collection, Future Perfect, is forthcoming from Queen’s Ferry Press in 2016, and his literary criticism can be found in The Journal of Ecocriticism and Private Fire: The Ecopoetry and Prose of Robert Francis (University of Delaware Press). He teaches composition, creative writing, and literature at BYU-Idaho.

Tim Bass (“Calls from Home,” p. 6) teaches creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. His work has appeared in Small Spiral Notebook, Fugue, Word Riot, and other publications.

Elizabeth Crowell‘s (“Concord,” p. 12) poetry has been published most recently in The Worcester Review, The Sheepshead Review, The Hollins Critic, and The Healing Muse. Her essay, “The Tag,” won the 2011 Bellevue Literary Review Burns Archive Prize for Nonfiction, judged by Jerome Groopman. An essay, “The Twin We Lost,” was published in The Boston Globe in March 2013.

A. Loudermilk’s (“Meaningless [Times Three],” p. 13) poetry and fiction can be read in Carolina Quarterly, Gargoyle, Smartish Pace, and Tin House. His poetry collections are The Daughterliest Son and Strange Valentine. He is also a cultural critic at his own website, Quirky Cinema, and has essays in River Teeth, Journal of International Women’s Studies, and Pop-Matters. He teaches literature and creative writing at Maryland Institute College of art in Baltimore, one of the country’s oldest fine arts colleges. He is originally from southern Illinois.

Gene Wilburn (Interview with Robert J. Sawyer, p. 20, and “Scapple: The Software You Didn’t Know You Needed,” p. 46) is a writer, photographer, and computer specialist residing in Port Credit, Ontario, near Toronto. He serves as an advisor and nonfiction editor for Small Print Magazine.

Howard Winn’s (“Supermarket on the Edge of Casco Bay,” p. 47, and “Part-Time Resident in Maine,” p. 25) fiction and poetry have been published recently by such journals as Dalhousie Review, Taj Mahal Review (India), Galway Review (Ireland), Antigonish Review, Literature Today, The Long Story, Pennsylvania Literary Review, Blueline, Chaffin Review, Thin Air Literary Journal, and New Verse News. His BA is from Vassar College. His doctoral work was done at NYU. He has been a social worker in California and currently is a faculty member of SUNY as Professor of English.

Raymond M. Wong (BOOK REVIEW: The Lifespan of a Fact by John D’Agata and Jim Fingal, p. 19) earned the Eloise Klein Healy Scholarship and an MFA in creative writing at Antioch University Los Angeles. His stories have appeared in six Chicken Soup for the Soul anthologies, USA Today, U-T San Diego, and San Diego Family magazine. He is an assistant editor at Lunch Ticket, Antioch’s online literary journal. His memoir, I’m Not Chinese: The Journey from Resentment to Reverence, was published by Apprentice House in 2014.


Contributing
Artists & Photographers

Valda Bailey (p. 5, 6)
Carolyn Clink (pp. 20, 23, 24)
Christina Frost (COVER)
Austin Granger (p. 26)
George Gray (p. 25)
Tetyana Kovyrina (p. 47)
Ian Muttoo (p. 5)
Redroom Studios (p. 12)
David Rockwell (pp. 13, 15, 18)
Georgi Tandashvili (p. 4)

 



SPRING/SUMMER 2014

Volume 2, Number 1
(ISSN 2328-9449 print; ISSN 2328-9457 online)


Calvin Ahlgren (“Old Year Psalm,” p. 19), Tennessee-born, migrated to Northern California in the mid-’60s. He is a former print journalist who gardens, cooks and teaches healing qigong and Yang-style tai chi. His work has been published in the West Marin Review, Blue Pen, the travel poem anthology Through a Distant Lens, the flash fiction magazine Cease, Cows, various Marin Poetry Center anthologies and elsewhere.

Kevin Casey (“Lupine Field: Moosehead Lake,” p. 17) is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts–Amherst and received his graduate degree at the University of Connecticut. His work has been accepted by The Milo Review, Futures Trading, Tule Review, and others, and he has served as editor for Crosscut Magazine. He teaches literature at a small university in Maine, where he enjoys fishing, snowshoeing, and hiking.

Michael Davis’s (“Ex Inferis,” p. 20) collection of stories, Gravity, was published by Carnegie Mellon University Press in 2009. His short fiction has appeared in Descant, The San Joaquin Review, The Jabberwock Review, The Black Mountain Review, Eclipse, Cottonwood, The Mid-American Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, The Georgia Review, The Chicago Quarterly Review, Willow Springs, The Normal School, Arcana, The Superstition Review, The New Ohio Review, Painted Bride Quarterly, and others. He has an MFA in fiction writing from the University of Montana and a PhD in English from Western Michigan University.

Marie Kane (“I Can Say Now That Things Are Not What They Seem,” p. 26) is poetry editor for Pentimento Magazine and the 2006 Bucks County (PA) Poet Laureate. Her poetry has appeared in the Bellevue Literary Review, U.S. 1 Worksheets, Wordgathering, Schuylkill Valley Journal, Naugatuck River Review, and Adanna Journal, among others. Her work has won prizes in competitions including the Poetry Society of New Hampshire, Inglis House, and the Robert Frasier poetry contest. Her chapbook, Survivors in the Garden (Big Table Publishing), was released in June of 2012.

Denton Loving (“Your Most Important Character: Developing Place in Fiction,” p. 27) is enrolled in the Writing Seminars MFA program at Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont, where his critical work is focused on sense of place in literature. His fiction, poetry, essays, and reviews are forthcoming in River Styx, Flyleaf and [PANK].

Steven Moore’s (“Room Where the Story Is Told,” p. 7) essays have appeared with The North American Review, The Southeast Review, Gravel, and DIAGRAM Magazine.

Robyn Ryle’s (“From ‘Good Enough’ to ‘Amazing’: How to Become a Better Editor of Your Own Work,” p. 29) short stories have appeared in Bartleby Snopes, WhiskeyPaper and Cease, Cows, among others. She teaches sociology at a liberal arts college in Indiana. She is also the author of a sociology of gender textbook with SAGE Press, Questioning Gender: A Sociological Exploration (2014).

Peter Serchuk (“On the Fern Canyon Trail,” p. 13) is the author of two collections of poetry: Waiting for Poppa at the Smithtown Diner (University of Illinois Press) and All That Remains (WordTech Editions). His poems have appeared in Boulevard, The Paris Review, North American Review, The Hudson Review, Texas Review and other places.

Raymond M. Wong (“Foreign,” p. 14) earned the Eloise Klein Healy Scholarship and an MFA in creative writing at Antioch University Los Angeles. His stories have appeared in four Chicken Soup for the Soul anthologies, USA Today, U-T San Diego, and San Diego Family magazine. He is an assistant editor at Lunch Ticket, Antioch’s online literary journal. “Foreign” will appear in his memoir, I’m Not Chinese: The Journey from Resentment to Reverence, which will be published by Apprentice House in late 2014.


Contributing
Artists & Photographers

Valda Bailey (p. 4)
Martin Cauchon (p. 29)
Kirsten Chursinoff (p. 17)
Karl Hurst (p. 18)
Jeane Myers (p. 6)
Rovingmagpie (p. 13)
Jorge Villaplana Sanjuan (pp. 5, 27)
Harriet Taylor Seed (cover, 5)
Gene Wilburn (p. 19)
Benoit Wittamer (p. 26)

 




 

FALL 2013

Volume 1, Number 1
(ISSN 2328-9449 print; ISSN 2328-9457 online)


CONTRIBUTORS

Valda Bailey, “Margate Abstract,” Photographic Artwork

Visit Valda Bailey’s website: http://www.valdabailey.co.uk/

Judith Barrington, “Interiors: The Writer in Search of Memory,” Creative Nonfiction

Judith Barrington’s Lifesaving: A Memoir won the 2001 Lambda Book Award and was a finalist for the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for the Art of the Memoir. She is also the author of the best-selling Writing the Memoir: From Truth to Art and three collections of poetry. She has been a faculty member of the University of Alaska Anchorage’s low-residency MFA Program and teaches workshops around the United States as well as in Britain and Spain. Her website is www.judithbarrington.com

“Interiors” was originally published online in Triplopia, Vol. V, Issue 1, Winter 2006, “Memory.”

William Blomstedt, “Sometimes Moving, Sometimes Stuck: Notes from a Bolivian Bus Journey,” Creative Nonfiction

William Blomstedt is a migratory beekeeper, geographer, and writer. He currently lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Steve Brannon, “Creative Catalyst: NaNoWriMo Founder Chris Baty,” Interview

Chris Baty is the founder of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). He now serves as a Board Member Emeritus for NaNoWriMo. He also teaches classes on writing and creativity through Stanford University’s Writer’s Studio. He’s the author of No Plot? No Problem! and co-author of Ready, Set, Novel. For more information, visit Chris Baty’s website: http://shop.chrisbaty.com/

Steve Brannon is the founding editor of Small Print Magazine.

Lynn G. Carlson, “Today We Work,” Creative Nonfiction

Lynn G. Carlson lives and writes in Cheyenne, Wyoming. She finds that the genre of creative nonfiction gives her plenty of room to roam—through memories, into and around insights, and deep into family stories. Lynn leads the In Our Own Words writing group at Chrysalis House, a residential addiction treatment center. Every other Wednesday, she and eight other women sit around a table, put pens to page, and dig for their authentic voices.

Ann Cefola, “A Wee Bit Supernatural. Scottish Novelist Regi Claire,” Interview

Ann Cefola is the author of Face Painting in the Dark forthcoming from Dos Madres Press, St. Agnes, Pink-Slipped (Kattywompus Press, 2011), Sugaring (Dancing Girl Press, 2007), and the translation Hence this Cradle (Seismicity Editions, 2007). Learn more at www.anncefola.com and www.annogram.blogspot.com.

Regi Claire’s The Waiting (Nov. 2012) was reprinted in 2013, and The Beauty Room (2002) is being reissued as a Birlinn e-book (distributed by Faber Factory). For more information, visit Regi Claire’s website at www.regiclaire.com or the publisher at www.word-power.co.uk.

Margaret Fieland, “Notes on NaNo,” Craft

Born and raised in New York City, Margaret Fieland lives in the suburbs west of Boston, Massachusetts, with her partner and seven dogs. Her poems, articles and stories have appeared in Main Channel Voices, Front Range Review and All Rights Reserved, among others. She is one of The Poetic Muselings, whose poetry anthology, Lifelines, was published in 2011. She is author of two science fiction novels and Sand in the Desert, a book of science fiction persona poems. Visit her website: www.margaretfieland.com.

Marie Kane, “Permission,” Poetry

Marie Kane’s poetry has been twice nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Her work has appeared in the Bellevue Literary Review, U.S. 1 Worksheets, Wordgathering, and others. She lives in Yardley, Pennsylvania, with her husband, Stephen Millner, an artist. Her website is www.mariekanepoetry.com.

Maja Lukic, “Pomegranate Hotel,” Fiction

Maja Lukic graduated from Cornell Law School in May 2010. She received a BFA in acting from the Memorial University of Newfoundland in 2007. Maja is currently working as an attorney and writing in New York City.

Yvon Maurice, “The Road of Death, Bolivia, 1991,” Photograph

Yvon Maurice is a world traveler who enjoys nature and adventures of all kinds.
He managed International Development projects for the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), mostly in Latin America and Africa, and has worked as a geologist in Canada.

He is in the processes of digitizing the photos he took during his travels between 1969 and 2003.

Saihou O. Njie, “She is Forever Giving,” Batik Artwork

Saihou Omar Njie was born in Banjul, The Gambia, in West Africa.

He studied Art and photography at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. Among other things, Saihou is renowned for his Batik art, which is collected internationally.

Marshall J. Pierce, “A Strapping Young Man,” Creative Nonfiction

Marshall J. Pierce is a Vermont-raised author now living in San Francisco, writing and producing for Evolve Media. His work has been featured in LitQuake, The Cynic, U., Patch.com, Crunchable and Piker Press, among other publications, and he was featured author/speaker for UC Berkeley’s extension program in Spring 2012.

Jack Remick, “A Short Course in Structure: Writing Tips for the Committed Novelist,” Craft

Jack Remick is a poet, short story writer, and novelist. He taught Fiction and Memoir in certificate programs at the University of Washington Extension and Distance Learning. He co-wrote The Weekend Novelist Writes A Mystery, with Robert J. Ray, a how-to, write-along for mystery writers. His latest novel, Gabriela and The Widow, is a Montaigne Medal Finalist in the Eric Hoffer Award competition as well as a finalist in the Book of the Year Award from Foreword Reviews. Satori, a collection of Jack Remick’s poetry published by Coffeetown Press, is now available. For more writing tips, visit his blog at www.blood.camelpress.com. His website is jackremick.com.

Bob Ritchie, “The Camper,” Fiction

Bob Ritchie is a writer, medical editor, and English teacher at a medical school in Puerto Rico.

Robyn Ryle, “Seven Tips for Surviving NaNoWriMo from Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Craft

Robyn Ryle teaches sociology at a small liberal arts college in Indiana. She has published fiction and flash fiction in Pea River Journal and WhiskeyPaper. She is also the author of a sociology of gender textbook with SAGE Press, Questioning Gender: A Sociological Exploration (2014). She is a national speaker on the importance of place from a sociological perspective and writes about place and other topics on her blog, you-think-too-much.com. She lives in a 140-year-old home in Madison, Indiana, with her husband, step-daughter, and two peculiar cats.

Veronica Webber, “Chis Baty Photograph,” Cover, courtesy of National Novel Writing Month

Gene Wilburn, “What is Markdown?”; “Distraction-free Editors”; “Tablet Writing: iPad & Android”; Tools; “Unicorns in Pyjamas,” Creative Nonfiction, “Untitled,” Black & White Photograph

Gene Wilburn is a writer, photographer, and computer specialist residing in Port Credit, Ontario, near Toronto. He serves as an advisor and nonfiction editor for Small Print Magazine.

Visit Gene Wilburn’s website http://www.genewilburn.com/

Raymond M. Wong, “Storycraft:The Complete Guide to Writing Narrative Nonfiction, by Jack Hart,” Book Review

Raymond M. Wong earned the Eloise Klein Healy scholarship and the MFA in creative writing at Antioch University Los Angeles. His stories have appeared in three Chicken Soup for the Soul anthologies, USA Today, U-T San Diego, and San Diego Family magazine. He is an assistant editor at Lunch Ticket, Antioch’s online literary journal.

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